First Signs of Kidney Failure

… Continued …

  1. High blood pressure. While it can be a trigger of kidney failure, it can also be the symptom of the problem. But it is also attributed by many different causes, having it doesn’t definitely mean you have problem in your kidneys!
  2. Changes in the urine, these could be the appearance or the amount of your urine (including number of times urine you pass). For instance, the abnormal appearance of urine such as frothy urine without known reason may signal something that goes awry with your kidneys.
  3. The decreased function of the kidneys can lead to fluid retention (as noted before), causing swelling in legs, ankles, feet, or even maybe around the eyes.
  4. Discomforts in the kidney area, such as pain.
  5. Vogue symptoms such as tiredness, difficulty sleeping, poor in concentration, headaches, poor appetite, breathlessness, itching, pins & needles, muscle cramps, nausea, and vomiting.

In a few cases, a metallic taste in your mouth or bad breath could also be the first sign of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Sometime blood in the urine can be found in people with CKD, but it’s likely to occur when the disease has become advanced.

Some of these symptoms are vogue, or can be associated with other conditions. Don’t make a conclusion on your own, see your doctor promptly if you have any unusual symptom – especially true if it persists or lasts longer than what you expect!

The symptoms you’re experiencing are not enough to make the diagnosis. Several tests are usually required, such as:

  1. Urine test to look for any abnormal variables associated with the function of your kidneys. For instance, excess protein in the urine points to numerous different conditions (including the abnormal function of the kidneys).
  2. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). This is special test to help analyze the performance of the kidneys in filtering and cleaning blood.
  3. Your blood pressure can describe lots of things. And high blood pressure may also signal the first sign of kidney failure.

How to prevent kidney failure?

CKD is one of the top leading causes for kidney failure. Preventing CKD is the best way to prevent kidney failure. If you have been diagnosed with CKD, control it as well! And if you are a diabetic, manage your blood sugar as well, too!

Your diet can play a key role. Avoid foods too high in salt, simple sugar, and saturated fats. This is important to help keep your blood pressure, blood cholesterol, and blood sugar under control. The following related posts may help:

  1. List of bad foods for your blood pressure.
  2. List of foods to reduce bad cholesterol.
  3. Diet for diabetes part I and part II

And don’t rely on particular foods! It’s much better to full your diet with a wide variety of healthy foods since each food has different unique properties.

Below are other things you can do to keep your kidneys healthy in long term:

  1. Stop smoking! Tobacco smoke is not only bad for your lungs, but also for your entire health (including your kidneys).
  2. Keep hydrated. If there is adequate water in the body, this can help kidneys a lot – but don’t overdo it (especially if you already have kidney disease)!
  3. Eat anything in balance, even healthy foods contain calories! This is important to keep your weight healthy.
  4. Exercise is the overall-health booster, including for your kidneys. To gain the benefit from your exercise optimally, you need to do it regularly.
  5. Don’t overdo it when taking a medicine! For instance, over-the-counter medications such as NSAIDs and ibuprofen can help cope with numerous different conditions. But don’t take them too regularly! If you need to use them in long term, make sure to discuss first with your doctor!

If you do concern to the health and function of your kidneys, consider taking regular kidney function screening (if necessary)! This is particularly recommended if you have diabetes, chronic hypertension, or other conditions that can affect your kidneys.

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