Is Peanut, Fructose, Cabbage, Tomato, or Tea Bad for Gout?

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Tomatoes and gout

Since gouty arthritis means that your body at the state of inflammation or more sensitive to excess inflammation, it’s recommended to restrict pro-inflammatory foods, too.

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There is opinion that tomatoes and some nightshade veggies may trigger inflammation. But this issue is not scientifically clarified yet. Even some studies suggest that certain substances in tomatoes may help fight against inflammation.

Tomatoes are rich in antioxidants as well as other essential nutrients such as fiber, lycopene, and vitamin C. However, if you think that your dietary tomatoes worsen your gout, consult with your physician /dietitian for more guidance.

Like peanuts, cabbage, and other fruits – tomatoes are commonly considered not bad for people with gout, particularly true if you eat them in their natural form and in moderation.

But be careful to some processed-tomato products such as tomato sauce, juice, and ketchup. Typically, they are rich in sodium and some are added with high-fructose corn syrup.

How about tea such as green tea?

Drinking tea (including for green tea) is commonly allowed for people with gouty arthritis. Although tea has some purine content, too – but not too high and still safe for gout!

However, drink it moderately, particularly true if you also have hypertension since tea contain some caffeine. See also the amount of caffeine in tea (especially for green tea) in this section!

Furthermore, watch on the amount of sugar you add for a cup of tea. Sugar contains fructose, too – and high dietary fructose may worsen gout, as noted before.

In addition, green tea is great source for antioxidant, helpful to provide stress relief, and may help improve the performance of immune system. But some tea (especially black tea) contains oxalate. And some people with gout are recommended to take diet low in oxalate to reduce the risk of kidney stones.

Citations /references:

  1. http://www.health.harvard.edu/newsletters/Harvard_Heart_Letter/2009/July/Ask-the-doctor-Why-is-peanut-butter-healthy-if-it-has-saturated-fat
  2. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21068145
  3. http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fs148
  4. http://academics.hamilton.edu/foodforthought/Our_Research_files/cabbage_cauliflower_kale.pdf

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One Comment
  1. SURESH DESAI
    May 11, 2018 | Reply

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